“If this (1906) is the infancy of automobiling, and it is only just beginning to crawl, as Professor Bell facetiously puts it, some new and startling developments are still before us. The question is, “Where will it all end”’ 

From the 1906 tournament

“It is speed that is wanted, with all question of cost eliminated.”

From a preview of the 1906 tournament

“After cars reach a speed of two miles a minute, every fifth of a second represents a fortune spent and an engineering triumph achieved.”

From a preview of the 1906 tournament

“Automobiles with a mile-a-minute record appeal to the average buyer, even though such speed is not permissible on the road.”

From a review of the 1906 tournament

“Mankind is not willing to go at a snail’s pace when it has been thoroughly demonstrated that we can outship the swiftest bird in its flight…We live in a rapid age, and we hear of great accomplishments about us so frequently that we consider the matter of little importance until it is brought to our consideration by some remarkable change in our own lives.”

From a review of the 1906 tournament

“I believe that the limit of speed is the point where it is no longer possible to see.”

Bob Burman

When Burman crossed the line to set the world record someone ran up to him to inform him of his feat:

 

“It was moments before I could talk. The breath had almost been driven from my body. Then I told him, “Well, I never want to again.’”

Bob Burman

On his record setting run at Daytona in 1911: “A man does not like to say he was afraid. I was afraid.”

Bob Burman

“It requires a thorough knowledge of the machines, an iron nerve and a cool hand to guide a machine with safety at a clip of one or more miles a minute.”

From a preview of the 1906 tournament

On Barney Oldfield' first ride in the 999:                                                          

“I tried out the car. Going over Niagara Falls would have been but a pastime after riding in it.”

Henry Ford

“After his one-mile record, Barney said that is about fast ‘enough’. Not because the machine could not make faster time, but Barney thinks that no man can drive faster and live. He said that under a 28 second gait the senses become numbed, principally through the force of the wind.”

J. Alexander Sloan, Manager for Barney Oldfield

“It was the opinion of many who attended the races last January (1905) that the running of stock car races was uninteresting and that the big powered racing machines furnished much more excitement.”

From a preview of the 1906 tournament

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